CT4.24 -The Universal Computer

Alan Turing introduces us to the idea of on and off as a way to represent, well anything.

  • 01 December
    20 minutes (Multiple time slots)
    Online
    Session information
    Sessions
    Session 1
    Wed 01 Dec 08:00 HST - Wed 01 Dec 08:20 HST
    Online
    Session 2
    Wed 01 Dec 10:00 HST - Wed 01 Dec 10:20 HST
    Online
    Session 3
    Wed 01 Dec 13:00 HST - Wed 01 Dec 13:20 HST
    Online
    Session 4
    Wed 01 Dec 15:00 HST - Wed 01 Dec 15:20 HST
    Online
    • $10.95 incl.
  • 08 December
    20 minutes (Multiple time slots)
    Online
    Session information
    Sessions
    Session 1
    Wed 08 Dec 08:00 HST - Wed 08 Dec 08:20 HST
    Online
    Session 2
    Wed 08 Dec 10:00 HST - Wed 08 Dec 10:20 HST
    Online
    Session 3
    Wed 08 Dec 13:00 HST - Wed 08 Dec 13:20 HST
    Online
    Session 4
    Wed 08 Dec 15:00 HST - Wed 08 Dec 15:20 HST
    Online
    • $10.95 incl. Tax
  • 15 December
    20 minutes (Multiple time slots)
    Online
    Session information
    Sessions
    Session 1
    Wed 15 Dec 08:00 HST - Wed 15 Dec 08:20 HST
    Online
    Session 2
    Wed 15 Dec 10:00 HST - Wed 15 Dec 10:20 HST
    Online
    Session 3
    Wed 15 Dec 13:00 HST - Wed 15 Dec 13:20 HST
    Online
    Session 4
    Wed 15 Dec 15:00 HST - Wed 15 Dec 15:20 HST
    Online
    • $10.95 incl. Tax
  • 22 December
    20 minutes (Multiple time slots)
    Online
    Session information
    Sessions
    Session 1
    Wed 22 Dec 08:00 HST - Wed 22 Dec 08:20 HST
    Online
    Session 2
    Wed 22 Dec 10:00 HST - Wed 22 Dec 10:20 HST
    Online
    Session 3
    Wed 22 Dec 13:00 HST - Wed 22 Dec 13:20 HST
    Online
    Session 4
    Wed 22 Dec 15:00 HST - Wed 22 Dec 15:20 HST
    Online
    • $10.95 incl. Tax
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Description

Course Description Icon

In 1936 Alan Turing invented the principle of the modern computer. He described an abstract digital computing machine consisting of a limitless memory and a scanner that moves back and forth through the memory, symbol by symbol, reading what it finds and writing further symbols

Alan Turing's conjecture that some purely mathematical yes–no questions can never be answered by computation is our first stepping stones to modern day digital binary computing.  


Testing?

YES.  This micro-lesson will use 15 minutes to cover the material and 5 minutes of testing. Just like most of our micro-lessons there will be a test after this lesson.

The entire class is 20 minutes long. 15 minutes will be devoted to material and 5 minutes for testing.

You will do great. Don't worry. You can always retest again if you aren't able to achieve 80% or better the first time around.


Target Audience

We think this material can be understand by students as young as 5th grade.

A Summary

 

Minimum Grade Best for students 5th grade and up
Complexity Level Low
Length 20 minutes / Class
Subject Area Principle of modern computer